(left)” Zelie” cocktail dress autumn/winter1954. House of Dior, designer: Christian Dior. (right)  Haute Couture Fall 2012, House of Dior, designer: Raf Simons. Image source: style.com
I’ve put together this special Then & Now as a tribute to Raf Simons, who is, in my opinion, one of the most important living designers. His debut collection stays true to the legacy of the House of Dior but offers an impressive personal interpretation. Although the cuts, silhouettes, prints, and fabric treatments heavily relay on the house’s archive, they seem refreshing and new- this is where is strength and talent truly shine.

(left)” Zelie” cocktail dress autumn/winter1954. House of Dior, designer: Christian Dior. (right)  Haute Couture Fall 2012, House of Dior, designer: Raf Simons. Image source: style.com

I’ve put together this special Then & Now as a tribute to Raf Simons, who is, in my opinion, one of the most important living designers. His debut collection stays true to the legacy of the House of Dior but offers an impressive personal interpretation. Although the cuts, silhouettes, prints, and fabric treatments heavily relay on the house’s archive, they seem refreshing and new- this is where is strength and talent truly shine.


(left) Yayoi Kusama with Infinity Mirror Room — Phalli’s Field, Castellane Gallery, New York, 1965 / Image courtesy: Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / © Yayoi Kusama, Yayoi Kusama Studio inc. (right) Designer: Masha Reva, photograph: Synchrodogs, style:Julie Pelipas, model: Lola Dikova. Published in Contributor Mag #5

(left) Yayoi Kusama with Infinity Mirror Room — Phalli’s Field, Castellane Gallery, New York, 1965 / Image courtesy: Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / © Yayoi Kusama, Yayoi Kusama Studio inc. (right) Designer: Masha Reva, photograph: Synchrodogs, style:Julie Pelipas, model: Lola Dikova. Published in Contributor Mag #5

(left) Lady Curzon, in Charles Fredrick Worth ‘Peacock Dress’, 1902-3. Oil on Canvas, attributed to William Logsdail, English (1859-1844). (right) Mary Jane Russell in Dior  gown. Photograph: Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Harper’s Bazaar, October 1951.

(left) Lady Curzon, in Charles Fredrick Worth ‘Peacock Dress’, 1902-3. Oil on Canvas, attributed to William Logsdail, English (1859-1844). (right) Mary Jane Russell in Dior  gown. Photograph: Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Harper’s Bazaar, October 1951.

(left) Paul Poiret, 1911. The Costume Institute, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, from the exhibition ‘The King of Fashion.’ (right) Natalia Grzybowski ‘Hybrid Collection,’ Spring Summer 2012. http://natalia-grzybowski.blogspot.co.nz/

(left) Paul Poiret, 1911. The Costume Institute, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, from the exhibition ‘The King of Fashion.’ (right) Natalia Grzybowski ‘Hybrid Collection,’ Spring Summer 2012. http://natalia-grzybowski.blogspot.co.nz/

(left) fragment from  The Times of the Day, by Alphonse Mucha, 1899. (right) Lady Gaga, Vogue March, 2011. Photograph by Mario Testino.

(left) fragment from  The Times of the Day, by Alphonse Mucha, 1899. (right) Lady Gaga, Vogue March, 2011. Photograph by Mario Testino.

(left) David Bowie, 1970s. (Right) Lady Gaga, August 2011.

(left) David Bowie, 1970s. (Right) Lady Gaga, August 2011.

(left) Models Dorian Leigh and Evelyn Tripp in Clair McCardell’s wool jersey dresses, photograph by Irving Penn, Vogue 1950. (right) John Galliano for Dior Haute Couture,  Fall 2008-2009
I particularly love these two images together because it reflects the identity of the designers who created them. The dress on the right is a wonderful example for the legacy of the House of Dior, and how deeply it influenced John Galliano. Throughout his career at the house he frequently looked back to its history and the early collections  created by Christian Dior himself. On the other hand, Clair McCardell was a modern designer in every respect, always looking ahead. Her designs still look contemporary today. In my point of view she is one of the most important American designers; her modern taste, her effortless chic, and her simple and practical clothes represent the essence of American style.

(left) Models Dorian Leigh and Evelyn Tripp in Clair McCardell’s wool jersey dresses, photograph by Irving Penn, Vogue 1950. (right) John Galliano for Dior Haute Couture,  Fall 2008-2009

I particularly love these two images together because it reflects the identity of the designers who created them. The dress on the right is a wonderful example for the legacy of the House of Dior, and how deeply it influenced John Galliano. Throughout his career at the house he frequently looked back to its history and the early collections  created by Christian Dior himself. On the other hand, Clair McCardell was a modern designer in every respect, always looking ahead. Her designs still look contemporary today. In my point of view she is one of the most important American designers; her modern taste, her effortless chic, and her simple and practical clothes represent the essence of American style.

(Left) Isabella Blow, Lobster hat by Philip Tracy. (right) Lady Gaga, Lobster hat by Philip Tracy, 2010.

(Left) Isabella Blow, Lobster hat by Philip Tracy. (right) Lady Gaga, Lobster hat by Philip Tracy, 2010.

(left) My Fair Lady, 1964. Costume design by Cecil Beaton. (right) Lady Gaga, Vanity Fair, January 2012. Photograph by Annie Leibovitz.

(left) My Fair Lady, 1964. Costume design by Cecil Beaton. (right) Lady Gaga, Vanity Fair, January 2012. Photograph by Annie Leibovitz.

(left) Wallis Simpson, The Duchess of Windsor, in Elsa Schiaparelli’s Lobster Dress, 1937. (right) Isabella Blow in Philip Treacy.

(left) Wallis Simpson, The Duchess of Windsor, in Elsa Schiaparelli’s Lobster Dress, 1937. (right) Isabella Blow in Philip Treacy.